Alaska Town’s Entire Police Force Quits

The entire police force of Sand Point, Alaska quit in July in a matter of just three weeks, leaving the town without any authoritative presence, and the transition has been smooth without any type of state enforcement agent.

Sand Point, an Alaskan island town with a population of about 1,000, had a police force of three officers and a police chief mid-July.

That’s when the officers, two of whom were a married couple, began to quit one after the other and then finally the police chief himself resigned.

City Administrator Andrew Varner said that the first officer wanted to be closer to a spouse who is in the military. A week later, two more officers, a married couple, left because of a “family decision.”

That left Sand Point police chief, Roger Bacon, who then decided to take a long-planned month-long vacation to Scotland. This decision cost him his job as a “mutual understanding” was reached between Bacon and the city council that if he left he wouldn’t be returning to his post.

“There was sort of a mutual understanding that if he left to go for a month-long journey — leaving the community with no law enforcement — that if he came back, he would not be an employee of the city,” Varner said. “Within a day or two, he had turned in his resignation.”

On July 20, the city of Sand Point released a press release calling for calm, stating that while the police department was “in transition,” citizens should “rest assured that the community will not be in a lawless state.”

Since the departure of the police force, the town has been calm. No more arrests and charges for fishing without a license, speeding down a public road or any of the other outrageous things that police across the nation try to enforce in the name of the state against the private individual citizen.

There was no Purge–like behavior, people weren’t killing each other without the police as is depicted in movies as propaganda for justifying the need for authoritative structure.

“Sand Point did not devolve into mass lawlessness,” Varner said.

“It’s not like the movie ‘The Purge,’ “in which all criminal activity becomes legal for a 12-hour period,” Alaskan State Troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters.

“Everyone was busy fishing, which was great,” Austin Roof, the general manager of the local public radio station KSDP 830 AM said.

Unfortunately, the paradise of not being harassed by state storm troopers won’t last long for the citizens of Sand Point.

The town has since chosen a new interim police chief, Hal Henning, the former police chief of Seldovia, Varner said.

Additionally, Sand Point will be further patrolled by Alaska State Troopers until they rebuild their armada. (For more from the author of “Alaska Town’s Entire Police Force Quits” please click HERE)

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