Hormones Used to Cure Fear of Migrants?

A group of researchers from Germany and the United States claims to have found at least a partial cure for xenophobia, a much heralded accomplishment in the wake of a historic migrant crisis that has swept more than 1.7 million Muslim refugees from the Middle East and Africa into Europe’s cities and led to fissures in social cohesion that some predict have sewn the seeds of civil war.

According to the researchers, the hormone drug oxytocin administered in combination with peer influence caused people inclined to have “negative attitudes” toward migrants to actually want to reach out and help them.

“Researchers have shown in a new study that the bonding hormone oxytocin together with social norms significantly increases the willingness to donate money to refugees in need, even in people who tend to have a skeptical attitude towards migrants,” the study concluded.

The experiment was carried out on three test groups by researchers at the University of Bonn Medical Center in cooperation with the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and the University of Lübeck in northern Germany. They conducted three experiments in which they tested a total of 183 subjects, who were all German natives. The subjects were asked to read about the needs of real-life refugee families and decide whether to donate money to them or to native German families with needs. (Read more from “Hormones Used to Cure Fear of Migrants?” HERE)

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