Amazon Workers Are Planning to Protest on Black Friday. Here’s Why.

By Townhall. Amazon employees at five the United Kingdom’s largest warehouses are planning to stage rallies and protests on Black Friday to bring attention to their “inhumane conditions,” Buzzfeed News reported. The protests are being staged by GMB Union who help negotiate on behalf of Amazon employees, although they aren’t officially recognized. Other unions throughout Europe are coordinating similar protests in collaboration with GMB. . . .

GMB general secretary Tim Roache called on Amazon to negotiate with the union in a statement:

The conditions our members at Amazon are working under are frankly inhuman. They are breaking bones, being knocked unconscious and being taken away in ambulances.

We’re standing up and saying enough is enough, these are people making Amazon its money. People with kids, homes, bills to pay — they’re not robots.

Jeff Bezos is the richest bloke on the planet; he can afford to sort this out. You’d think making the workplace safer so people aren’t carted out of the warehouse in an ambulance is in everyone’s interest, but Amazon seemingly have no will to get round the table with us as the union representing hundreds of their staff.

(Read more from “Amazon Workers Are Planning to Protest on Black Friday. Here’s Why.” HERE)

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Amazon re-opens U.S. store to Australian shoppers after backlash

By Reuters. Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) said on Thursday it would stop blocking Australians from shopping on its U.S. site after a customer backlash, unwinding a move which has tarnished the e-commerce giant’s launch in the world’s 12th-largest economy.

The reversal relieved shoppers who had complained since July about being locked out of the much larger range of offerings they had grown accustomed to on the U.S. site following the opening of Amazon’s local platform a year ago.

But it also raised questions about why Amazon had cited Australian tax laws to explain the initial block – an issue rival eBay Inc (EBAY.O) had managed to resolve without locking Australians out of its U.S. site. (Read more from “Amazon re-opens U.S. store to Australian shoppers after backlash” HERE)

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