There’s Something on These Secret Police Tapes That a 2020 Candidate Doesn’t Want Released

By Townhall. South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg is officially a candidate for the 2020 Democratic nomination. You wouldn’t think that a mayor of a small city would be in contention, but he’s at the top. His star has been rising since rumblings of his campaign moves were reported. He raised more money than better-known progressives, like Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA). He’s in the top five in terms of those filling their war chests. He’s apparently been well received in Iowa. So, with the 2020 Democratic clown car getting bigger, how do you thin the heard? Well, you attack and it seems the opposition research firms are doing their best in trying to create a race problem for Buttigieg. It deals with the demotion of the city’s first black police chief (via The Hill):

An Indiana judge will rule soon on whether to release five cassette tapes of secretly recorded conversations between South Bend police officers that led to the 2012 demotion of Police Chief Darryl Boykins, the city’s first ever black police chief.

The South Bend City Council subpoenaed Buttigieg to win release of the tapes, which were at the center of a police department shake-up and a series of lawsuits.

Buttigieg’s critics say he’s gone to great lengths to conceal the contents of the tapes, which some believe could include racist language by white police officers.

There is roiling anger in South Bend over the allegations of racism. Black leaders in the city say that if there is evidence of racism, it could call into question scores of convictions that stemmed from white police officers investigating black suspects in a city that is 25 percent black.

(Read more from “There’s Something on These Secret Police Tapes That a 2020 Candidate Doesn’t Want Released” HERE)

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Secret Tapes? “Mayor Pete” Jumps Into The Race — And So Does Oppo Research

By Hot Air. Like so many others who run for president, Pete Buttigieg’s official announcement yesterday came as an anti-climax after having telegraphed the move for weeks if not months. “They call me Mayor Pete,” the Democrat told a home-town crowd, highlighting his “audacity” at running an outsider campaign for the nomination at his young age. . .

CNN was pretty impressed with the “electric” atmosphere. Vanessa Yurkevich notes that the only really surprising development was that Buttigieg avoided talking about Pence in his launch speech. Alex Burns calls him a “generational change agent” that threatens the ambitions of Kamala Harris and Bernie Sanders:

Or maybe he’s causing someone a sleepless night or two. It’s hardly a coincidence that this bomb dropped within hours of Buttigieg’s official entry into the race:

Pete Buttigieg’s meteoric rise as a presidential candidate is putting a spotlight on his years as mayor of South Bend, Ind., including his demotion of an African American police chief.

An Indiana judge will rule soon on whether to release five cassette tapes of secretly recorded conversations between South Bend police officers that led to the 2012 demotion of Police Chief Darryl Boykins, the city’s first ever black police chief.

(Read more from “Secret Tapes? “Mayor Pete” Jumps Into The Race — And So Does Oppo Research” HERE)

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