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Did an HBO Show Solve a 14-Year-Old Murder Case? [+video]

By Jessica Contrera and Peter Holley. From the moment the HBO series “The Jinx” made its debut, it has been called “the new ‘Serial.’” Both the series and the podcast are about unsolved murders. Both let viewers into the process of uncovering what happened. Both tell stories so compelling, it’s easy to sometimes forget the characters are real.

But on Saturday, HBO achieved something “Serial” never could. The subject of its six-episode documentary “The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst” has been arrested.

Robert Durst, a New York real-estate heir, is known for his alleged connection to three deaths: his wife, who went missing in 1982; his neighbor, who was dismembered in 2001; and a close friend, who was shot in the head in 2000. Until Saturday, the 71-year-old has walked free.

But days after HBO aired the fifth episode of “The Jinx,” which included a previously uncovered piece of evidence, Durst was taken into custody in New Orleans and will be charged with the Beverly Hills murder of his friend, Susan Berman . . .

“He’s maintained his innocence for 10 years now. Nothing has changed,” Lewis told The Washington Post in an interview Sunday. He accused prosecutors and the filmmaker, Andrew Jarecki, of timing of the arrest as a publicity stunt for the last episode of “The Jinx,” which will air at 8 p.m. Sunday. (Read more from “Did an HBO Show Solve a 14-Year-Old Murder Case?” HERE)

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Wealthy Eccentric Says in HBO Finale He ‘Killed Them All’

By Janet Mcconnaughey and Brian Melley. The arrest of Robert Durst, a wealthy eccentric linked to two killings and his wife’s disappearance, came on Sunday just before the finale in an HBO show about his life in which he said he “killed them all.”


Durst was arrested on a murder warrant just before Sunday evening’s finale of an HBO serial documentary about his links to three sensational killings.

In the finale, Durst was asked about similarities in handwriting in a letter he wrote and another linked to one of the killings. Later, filmmakers said Durst wore his microphone into the bathroom.

What followed was a bizarre rambling in which Durst said, apparently to himself, “There it is. You’re caught” and “What the hell did I do? Killed them all of course.” (Read more from this story HERE)

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News Room Honest Three Minutes

Why the “most honest 3 minutes on TV ever” is a lie (+video)

Have you seen this video yet?  You’ve got to check out the clip below.  It’s of a new show “The Newsroom”, on HBO, staring Jeff Daniels, and written and directed by the guy who gave us the idealized version of a democratic administration in “The West Wing,” Aaron Sorkin.

I know we are probably of like minds on this, but let me vent here. Indulge me.

In the clip below, the Jeff Daniels character sits on a panel at college event, when a student asks the question: “Why do you think America is great?” The woman to the left of Daniels gives a drab, center-left answer and the man to his right (portrayed as the conservative) simply states, “Freedom and Freedom.”

But then, Jeff Daniel’s character shocks the audience and the moderator by challenging the question itself.  He goes into an aggressive monologue about why America isn’t great anymore.  The audience is left with the choice of the partisan vagaries uttered by the two panelists, or Jeff’s speech on why we are no longer great, but used to be.  Watch the clip (caution: it contains profanity) and then see what your take is:


Ok, did you watch it?  No seriously, watch it now.

So here’s my take.  Firstly, my vote on the best answer goes to the guy who said “Freedom” twice. Simple, and effective, he nailed it.  The problem, as is so often the case, the left, and Sorkin in this case, are so full of themselves, so intent on satisfying their own intellectual ego, that there can be no truth, no solution, no revelation, unless THEY thought of it.

So we get a demeaning of the word “Freedom,” and a lecture from Daniels on, ironically, all things moral?!

Jeff Daniels is woefully ignorant (or rather Aaron Sorkin who apparently wrote the monologue) of what Freedom actually means, and is completely oblivious to things like socialism, government regulation, personal liberty, etc. and what they mean relative to that word “Freedom.”  He also seems blissfully unaware of immigration statistics and the enormous number of people still desperate to come to the US, as opposed to Canada, Belgium, Australia, or other western countries.

“War on Poor People,” that’s what we have? If so, blame the class warfare and welfare state created by those that Sorkin supports and adores as heroes on the left.  You want to start a “War on Poverty,” then deregulate, and reduce the tax burden on those doing the work and those starting the businesses that employ people.  Make a competitive environment for business, instead of casting them as the enemy, and you will have jobs and prosperity, and sense of self worth instilled in your citizenry.

You don’t “fight” poverty anyway, you increase prosperity. There’s a real difference — but the significance of that difference is lost on left wing idealists who live in Hollywood and DC and have no comprehension of starting and running a small business, and don’t have the time in their egocentric lives to even take an academic interest in the beliefs of those who founded, and made this country great, or who fight for its greatness still today.

Sorkin may or may not fit into that category of Hollywood and DC liberal, but his portrayal of folks I know and have worked with — like those in the Tea Party, loving patriots who cherish the Constitution — his assertion that they are the “problem” only serves to point out how truly upside down this line of thinking is.

He uses the language, and speaks of “morality” through his surrogate, Will McAvoy (Jeff Daniels’ character), but has no idea what the word means.  There is no morality without God, and yet he scoffs at this notion and implies that America leads the world in ignorance because it has the most citizens per capita that believe in angels.

America may not be the greatest country in the world anymore — after the last presidential election, and in Alaska, the last senatorial election, I certainly have my doubts — but it’s not for any of the reasons that Sorkin sites. If Sorkin really wants to return to American greatness, maybe he should start at the start, and look at the men and words of its foundation, and search for the heart of what made us great, in the words and deeds of the men who fought and died creating and protecting it, instead of plying leftist propaganda in pseudo-intellectual elitist centrist wrapping, and calling it a return to the “good old days.”

The “good old days” weren’t always good, but their core values were: a country that cherished the rights of the individual over the rights of the state, that trusted God, not Government, as their ultimate arbiter of morality.  The people of that era weren’t great because they were informed, per se, as Sorkin asserts, they were great because they read the bible, feared God, and loved liberty.  It was those qualities that drove them to become informed.  But information without the will and the moral wisdom to act on it is useless.

Liberty gave them that will, and God that wisdom.  Sorkin can’t, or rather his intellectual elitist egotism won’t let him see that.

That’s my take. What do you think?

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Dr Walter Campbell is a lifelong Alaskan, former Marine, and physician.