Media Power Defining Santorum

Over the past thirty years, a strange thing has happened on the path to the presidency. With the advent of the twenty-four-hour news cycle and the proliferation of media outlets, potential presidential nominees can no longer control or establish their image in the minds of the public.

This is particularly true of someone whom the public does not know. Barack Obama was a virtual unknown when he decided to run for the White House in 2007. But he had three major characteristics that worked in his favor: 1) he was of African-American descent; 2) as Joe Biden put, it he was “clean and articulate”; and 3) he was a liberal Democrat. He thus became the darling of the mainstream and entertainment media and nearly all the cable news outlets as well as many websites. This set the stage for the image which settled into the minds of the majority of the public.

This image was of not only a candidate who could deliver a good speech, but also of a person who had a positive vision for America, had the interest of the people at heart, and because of his unique racial background could heal the age-old racial wounds in the country. Obama did little beyond read his teleprompter-assisted speeches, which were full of inane platitudes, and hold his own in debates to achieve this lofty image in the minds of the people. The overall media, Hollywood, and the entertainment press did the rest.

It is vital that presidential candidates, particularly in the Republican primary process, understand the vital importance of not allowing the overall media/entertainment cabal to establish their image in the minds of the public. The vast majority of this group is hostile to any Republican, but in particular to conservative candidates.

This is particularly important for anyone who is not well-known to the public and has not been on center stage for many years.

Read More at American Thinker By Steve McCann, American Thinker