Regular Cannabis Use Harmful Regardless of Age Person Starts Using, Long-Term Study Suggests

New research led by the University of Queensland has found that regular cannabis use may have harmful effects later in life, irrespective of the age the person first started using it. The findings showed that life outcomes for regular users were worse by age 35 compared to those who had not regularly smoked.

The 20 year-long prospective cohort study, led by Dr Gary Chan from UQ’s National Centre for Youth Substance Use Research, compared those who initiated cannabis use during high school to those who started after high school, comparing their life outcomes to non-users by age 35.

The findings of the study are published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Review.

“Compared to non-users, regular cannabis users were more likely to engage in high-risk alcohol consumption, smoke tobacco, use other illicit drugs and not be in a relationship at age 35,” Dr Chan said in a statement. “These outcomes were more common among those who started using cannabis regularly in adolescence.”

“They were also at higher risk of depression and less likely to have a paid job.” Dr Chan continued. “Overall, regular use of cannabis – more than weekly and especially daily use – was found to have harmful consequences, regardless of the age people began using it.” (Read more from “Regular Cannabis Use Harmful Regardless of Age Person Starts Using, Long-Term Study Suggests” HERE)

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